Why Writers Should Care About Infrastructure

Infrastructure header that shows electrical lines superimposed above a disaster scene

Infrastructure makes everyday life — as we know it — possible. Much of it is buried and can go unthought of when it’s working; however, throw in a major storm that overwhelms our wastewater systems, and bam! we’re wading through poop water.

The average person really pays no mind to infrastructure — minus during times of failure or when news headlines note the U.S.’s crumbling infrastructure. Writers need to step outside that blissful complacency though.  The benefits are too good to pass up. Continue reading


Acceptance Cover And Blurb Revealed

Acceptance by S.M. Wright Cover

Acceptance arrives Friday, Nov. 24, on the Kindle. Link to Amazon coming soon.


After much blood, sweat, and tears (so many tears), I’m pleased to reveal the cover of Acceptance, the first story in The Augur’s Rose Series. I drew and painted it in Photoshop CS4 using my Wacom Bamboo tablet. The process included many layers,  various reference photos for the lovely hooded crow (Vidar), and a copious number of Bob Ross photos for encouragement — particularly when it came to capturing the “happy” grass. Continue reading

Be on the lookout!

November is a hopping month for me, to say the least. Since work on my sci-fi novel is shelved as it sits in the slush pile, I’m stoking the flames of industry to see a few projects to certain levels of completion, including pushing one baby birdy out of the nest. The latter of which will hopefully be to the enjoyment of readers.

Serial Launching This November

I am excited to announce that I’m launching my sword and sorcery serial this month, with the first short story set to land on the Kindle, Nov. 24 — yes, Black Friday. On a whole, the serial will feature a running series of short stories revolving around Svein and his (mis)adventures as he treads a fine line between his oath — taken upon his birth — to serve the Sisters and protecting his freedom. The fact necromancy is experiencing a renaissance of sorts is another matter entirely.

Acceptance will launch the series, and I will be posting more details in the days to come. Continue reading

Beta Reading Process Part 3: The Data

This is the final part of an ongoing series about the beta reading process. To read the previous entries, visit Part I and Part II.

All right. You’ve wrapped up the beta reading process, and depending on the number of beta readers you had, you might have a lot of data to pore over. It can overwhelming, particularly if there is a lot of constructive comments. Heck, it might also have you seeing red because your manuscript is your special baby. That is why you, dear writer, need to take a deep breath and step back. Sure, browse the comments, read all of them from each beta reader, but don’t act on them, at least not yet. Continue reading

Beta Reading Process Part 2: Writers vs. Readers

Diving further into the beta reading process, this time around we’re going to explore the readers themselves. Who makes the better beta reader, fellow writers or straight-up readers? Well, I’m afraid there will be no concrete answer to this question; however, I will share my own observations, because these two groups did bring different input to the table during the beta process.

For starters, I had three fellow writers (two who finished) and four readers — a good mix all said and done, and I highly recommend a good mix between the lot.  In particular, I noticed that the straight-up readers tended to finish the manuscript faster; two were scary fast and have already been sniffing around for the sequel (I need to get on that). Readers brought up some great points up, some of which were shared by the writers, but for the most part were very light on their comments and not as critical. I like to say they rolled with the punches. They were patient and waited until the end to draw conclusions, much like one would do with a published novel — to a point. Continue reading

Writing, waiting for a diagnosis and Grant

I don’t have a diagnosis. I just have a swelling thyroid that has nodules. And it sucks.

My doctor for the past few years has always commented on my thyroid, that it looked big to her. Blood work, however, has always come back stellar and I’d felt normal. Then this last time (this past April) in addition to blood work, she wanted an ultrasound. I heehawed about the ultrasound, thinking largely of the expense, but then my thyroid did something it hadn’t done before — it swelled. Suddenly, I’m having trouble sipping from a straw; of course, panic probably didn’t help.

I instantly scheduled the ultrasound, but couldn’t get in until after a work trip to Tampa, FL  — joy, right? So here, I was waiting and dreading. Continue reading

“Sisters” — A short romp through history


If you are looking for a short read, I highly recommend that you head over to Amazon quickly! Rachelle M.N. Shaw’s latest short story is free, and as my dad says (and he always does say it), nothing is better than free. To top it off, it’s a quality character-driven piece that focuses on the relationship of two sisters. I don’t want to say too much; however, those with siblings will likely relate to the challenges of growing up together and the morphing of the blood ties that always tie you to each other.

The free deal will be running through until tomorrow at midnight — so don’t turn into a pumpkin by passing up on this opportunity! And for those who use GoodReads (I don’t use it half as much as I should), you can reach the book via the following link: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/35219698-sisters.